Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The EU Crisis Pocket Guide


Contents

  • How a private debt crisis was turned into a public debt crisis and an excuse for austerity
  • The way the rich and bankers benefited while the vast majority lost out
  • The devastating social consequences of austerity
  • The European Union's response to the crisis: more austerity, more privatisation, less democracy
  • Map of resistance across the EU in 2012
  • Ten alternatives put forward by civil society groups to put people and the environment before corporate greed
  • Resources for further information

Visit the webpage
Download the Pocket Guide 

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Auckland protest against Israeli strikes on Gaza

2pm

Saturday

17th November

Aotea Square

Global Peace & Justice Auckland is organising a march this Saturday to protest Israel’s assassination of a Palestinian leader in the Gaza Strip and the deadly rocket attacks in which many Palestinians have lost their lives.
  
The protest will gather at Aotea Square from 2pm and march to the US Consulate in Customs Street.
 
More information

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Australia in the Asian Century

 
Blueprint for war and corporate
exploitation

"The transformation of the Asian region into the economic powerhouse of the world is not only unstoppable, it is gathering pace," Prime Minister Julia Gillard says in the foreword to the government’s White Paper, "Australia in the Asian Century". "Our region will be the world’s largest producer of goods and services and the largest consumer of them," says Gillard. And, according to the White Paper, Australia is in Asia and in a strong position to capitalise on that.

Read more . . .

Returning to the Commune of Paris


The narrative of the Commune became deeply ideological as soon as the Third Republic’s troops, still furious about France’s defeat in the Franco-Prussian war and the punitive settlement of January 1871, crushed it. Now, Verso have reissued ex-Communard Prosper-Olivier Lissagaray’s seminal History of the Commune of Paris of 1871, first published in French in 1876 whilst Lissagaray was exiled in Belgium, and translated into English in 1886 by his lover Eleanor Marx. With this highly detailed text, Lissagaray intended to combat the "bourgeois slanders and lies" that followed the Commune’s suppression, to draw lessons and set the terms for future histories. But if, after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the decline of Marxist parties, the Commune no longer forms a paradigm for a revolutionary "dictatorship of the proletariat", as Engels and Lenin claimed, what can contemporary readers take from Lissagaray?

Read more . . .